metal detectors

Free Metal Detecting Tips

The "bottomless bucket tool"
Author: Internet Tip
Take a plastic five gallon paint bucket, cut the bottom out and reinforce the bottom cut edge with a 1 inch wide stainless steel band riveted in place with flush rivets. At your favorite wet zone, when the sand is like sponge and constantly caves on your target digs and your scoop won't pull it out, use the bucket. Firmly press the bucket down, centered over the target zone, until you stop on a rock or gravel layer or the rim is flush with the surrounding sand. Quickly scoop out wet, mushy sand with your favorite home built scoop, I use a cut 1 gal. Clorox jug with handle intact for mine. In about 20 seconds you will have a 2 foot hole in wet sand that won't cave in, even when an occasional small wave wash spills through the area. This is now usually deep enough to get at the ring or coin no matter how mushy the surrounding sand is. I've used this to also sample bedrock potholes for concentrated targets where the overburden is 1 to 2 ft thick. When conditions are right, you can find pockets with hundreds of coins, retrieve them all without fighting the quicksand that normally floods that dig site.
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I'll never forget the first time I swung a metal detector and it BEEPED! I dug up my treasure and I held that shiny circle of metal in my hand--a quarter!! Wow! A whole twenty-five cents! Since then I have treasured hunted all over the world. This site has info on metal detectors and hopefully anything else you need to know about metal detecting, treasure hunting, and finding gold!

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The Pyramids of Giza
Author: Steven N. Ng
The most famous Egyptian pyramids to be built are the Great Pyramids of Giza, located in the outskirts of present-day Cairo. There are over 100 Egyptian pyramids of various sizes, and over 50 more in neighboring Sudan. However, the three Great Pyramids of Giza earn their fame by being the largest of these.

In the most popular pictures of the Pyramids of Giza, like the one shown below, the middle pyramid, that of Khafre (Chephren), appears larger due to the angle and because it was built on higher ground. The largest pyramid is actually the Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops), the one on the left.

The Great Pyramid of Khufu

Contrary to popular belief, not all the Great Pyramids of Giza are considered part of the Seven Wonders of the World. Only the largest, the Great Pyramid of Khufu, is a member, and is the only one of the Seven Wonders that still stands. Egypt was also home to another of the Seven Wonders of the World, the Lighthouse of Alexandria, which was destroyed long ago.

The Pyramid of Khufu has a height of 145 m (475 ft) and a base area of 52,400 sqm (562,500 sqft). That area is large enough to fit over 20 Olympic-size swimming pools! And for thousands of years, until the rise of modern-day skyscrapers, the pyramid was the tallest building in the world.

What makes the pyramid an architectural triumph and one of the Seven Wonders of the World is the fact that the rocks used in its construction each way more than 2 tons. And there are more than 2 million of those rocks.

Greek travelers to ancient Giza wrote that it took a hundred thousand slaves 20 years to construct the pyramid. However, since they visited Egypt more than 2 thousand years after the Egyptian pyramids were built, the truth of their accounts are suspect. Modern engineers estimate that it would likely take less people and less time to build the pyramid using technology that was available at that time.

Treasures of the Pharaoh

The Pyramid of Khufu was built by the Egyptian Pharaoh Khufu (Cheops) in the 4th Dynasty circa 2560 BC, making it over 4500 years old! It is widely accepted that the pyramid was built to bury Pharaoh Khufu when he died. However, many other conspiracy theories abound as to why the pyramids were built, ranging from astronomical observatories to alien artifacts.

Since Egyptian Pharaohs were noted for being buried with their great treasure, Arab conquerors attempted to gain entrance into the Pyramid of Khufu in order to plunder it.

They managed to find a few narrow passages that led both up into the center of the pyramid, and down beneath the massive structure. However, all they managed to find at the end of these passages were empty chambers. No mummies or treasure was found in the pyramid.

During the Arabs' excavation of the Pyramid of Khufu, they encountered various boulders and slabs that were used to seal the passages and chambers within the pyramid. They also found hidden doors. This probably fueled the many myths about the Egyptian pyramids being booby-trapped, and where a grave robber who managed to get in would never get out alive.

A 17th century Englishman managed to uncover another shaft connecting the passages, but still no treasure was to be found.

Two conclusions can be derived from this. One, ancient tomb raiders have long since plundered all the treasure from the pyramid, leaving behind nothing but a few empty chambers. Or two, Khufu's mummy and treasure is still cleverly hidden within (or beneath) the Great Pyramid.

For more information on the Pyramids, visit http://www.nekhebet.com/w_pyramids.html

About the Author

Steven maintains the informational website Wonders of Ancient Egypt at http://www.nekhebet.com . Do visit if you want to find out more about the wonders of Egypt such as the Pyramids and the Lighthouse; or mysteries such as mummifcation and conspiracy theories; or its religion and history.


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